(Source: nickdrake, via cinefamily)

Notes 101

theatlantic:

88, or How Telegraphers Coded ‘Love and Kisses’

What humans will do to save themselves from typing a few characters: LOL. ROTFL. TTYL. <3. BRB. Universal sentiments and actions become encoded.

Well, imagine that each character had to be tapped down the line in Morse code. Telegraph operators had even more incentive to cut down on letters than did even the T9 texters of yore.

And so they came up with codes to communicate the things that they needed to say often. These were first codified by Walter P. Phillips into what became known as the Phillips Code in 1879. (It was updated several times, the last I found in 1975.) 
Nearly all of these codes are now obsolete.
Read more. [Image: Flickr commons]

theatlantic:

88, or How Telegraphers Coded ‘Love and Kisses’

What humans will do to save themselves from typing a few characters: LOL. ROTFL. TTYL. <3. BRB. Universal sentiments and actions become encoded.

Well, imagine that each character had to be tapped down the line in Morse code. Telegraph operators had even more incentive to cut down on letters than did even the T9 texters of yore.

And so they came up with codes to communicate the things that they needed to say often. These were first codified by Walter P. Phillips into what became known as the Phillips Code in 1879. (It was updated several times, the last I found in 1975.) 

Nearly all of these codes are now obsolete.

Read more. [Image: Flickr commons]

Notes 130

(via yochlochlo)

F to 7th - Episode 2 -Tweener - with Ashlie Atkinson

(Source: vimeo.com)

Notes 0

Cabinet

Two things from Cabinet:

Forensic Topology

Indeed, Friend, like Rehder, seems to argue that a city gets the kinds of crime appropriate to its form—or, more actively, it gets the kinds of crime its fabric calls for.

Of course, there are many other factors that contribute to the high incidence of bank robbery in Los Angeles, not least of which is the fact that many banks, Rehder explains in his book, make the financial calculation of money stolen per year vs. annual salary of a full-time security guard—and they come out on the side of letting the money be stolen. The money, in economic terms, is not worth protecting.

Making Up Hollywood

At first, film actors would arrive on set already made up, having used either a commercial greasepaint product designed for the stage or homemade concoctions of lard, talc, and pigment. Actors shared tips with each other and a few studios provided how-to pamphlets. A more convincing skin color could be made by adding brick dust or paprika; a layer of cold cream, petroleum jelly, or vegetable shortening could be applied before the paint, and a puff of flour after, to diminish the shine; white paint could be used to hide a double chin; dimples could be drawn in with a touch of lipstick. But even with the most expert application, greasepaint was a crude medium. It was stiff and dense, and tended to aggravate skin conditions that then required more greasepaint. There was no solution for the seams that were visible along the hairline and collar, and, as the name suggests, the substance was nearly impossible to wash off. Most vexing of all, greasepaint remained perfectly intact only when the face was slack. A lifted eyebrow or a smile caused the makeup to craze with hairline cracks. Though imperceptible to a distant theater audience, the defect was catastrophic on film.

Notes 0

Notes 1

superseventies:

1978 Pontiac Firebirds: Trans Am, Esprit, Formula.

superseventies:

1978 Pontiac Firebirds: Trans Am, Esprit, Formula.

(Source: pinterest.com)

Notes 106

(Source: likiteesplit, via theacademy)

New York Film Academy’s study of gender inequality in the film industry.

(Source: howtocatchamonster, via christinemix)

Notes 194

theacademy:

When Paramount refused to fund Hitchcock’s 1960 film, the Master of Suspense bankrolled it himself for just $800k. The result was a financial and artistic success that accounted for more than $60 million in box office receipts. “Psycho” was so popular it was re-released five years later and remains one of his most popular films. A fine example of putting your money where your… shower curtain is.

theacademy:

When Paramount refused to fund Hitchcock’s 1960 film, the Master of Suspense bankrolled it himself for just $800k. The result was a financial and artistic success that accounted for more than $60 million in box office receipts. “Psycho” was so popular it was re-released five years later and remains one of his most popular films. A fine example of putting your money where your… shower curtain is.

Notes 739

(Source: ginchface, via j4wbreaker)

deathandmysticism:

Jan Van Bonedale, Croniques de Brabant, ca. 1351


Jan van Boendale, Chroniques de Brabant (c. 1351)

deathandmysticism:

Jan Van Bonedale, Croniques de Brabant, ca. 1351

Jan van Boendale, Chroniques de Brabant (c. 1351)

(via soren-kittygaard)

Notes 801